Focusing on You: Comprehensive Center for Brain Health Opens in Boca Raton

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The Center focuses on treating and preventing degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease and Lewy Body Dementia.

James Galvin, M.D., M.P.H., the director of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s Comprehensive Center for Brain Health, describes how the new center’s goal is to better treat and prevent degenerative brain diseases like Alzheimer’s and Lewy Body Dementia through research studies and seeing patients.

Bobbi Rutt is one of those patients; this is her story.

At 84 years old, Bobbi noticed her memory wasn’t as sharp as it used to be.

“No matter where you are or what you are, there are times, you suddenly forget a name,” she says.

She met with world-renowned neurologist and researcher James Galvin, M.D., M.P.H., the director of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s Comprehensive Center for Brain Health, which opened its doors in Boca Raton in November 2021.

“The focus of our research is on neurodegenerative diseases. Slow degenerative diseases of the brain that affect memory and other thinking abilities. This includes Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body dementia,” Dr. Galvin says.

The center’s goal is to better treat and prevent these diseases through projects like the Healthy Brain Initiative.

“We test their memory, we test their cognition thinking. We ask about psychological traits,” says Dr. Galvin.

“Doctor, what can we do to keep our brains healthy?” asks anchor Pam Giganti.

“We're very interested in this concept of resilience. It revolves around your physical activity, your cognitive and leisure activities, what you do for fun, what you do for enjoyment, our diet, what we eat,” Dr. Galvin says.

Bobbi was diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment but says the center is teaching her techniques to preserve her memory.

“I'm doing exercising at home on my own. We have a salad, a nice leafy green salad every single night. I see a tremendous difference,” Bobbi says.

Learn more about the Comprehensive Center for Brain Health.

 

 

 


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