The Easiest Way to Stop COVID-19

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Torre

A message from Carlos Torre, M.D.
Otolaryngologist
University of Miami Health System

As you may be aware, it is now a mandate to wear a mask in public due to the increasing number of COVID-19 cases in Florida.

People not wearing a mask in public could be fined and could face a misdemeanor citation. A face mask can definitely protect you and others from the spread of the coronavirus, but they are only effective when worn properly. Therefore, it is important to make sure that you cover both your mouth and your nose, which are the more vulnerable spots on your face.

The key is to make sure that the majority of your nose and your entire mouth is covered.

Wearing a mask takes some time to get used to, but it should never restrict your ability to breathe. You should always try to cover your mouth and your nose. Avoid having any gaps that allow the air to go around the mask.

If you suffer from a nasal obstruction, you may feel it is difficult to breath with a mask, even if it's not super tight. In that case, you may consider getting evaluated by an ear, nose, and throat specialist who can help you breathe better through your nose. This will allow you to feel more comfortable with your mask – and to protect yourself and others from the spread of the virus.

At the University of Miami Health System, we are committed to fight this virus and to protect our patients through research, education, and prevention.

Stay safe.

 


CDC facemaskGraphic source: CDC.gov

 

 


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